Photo-essay: London between the wars

1920s and 1930s continue to provide endless inspiration for writers, re-enactors, swing dancers, vintage lovers and period drama directors alike. It was a difficult, bitter, glittering, glorious, complex time. The city awoke from its post-WW1 slumber and sprung into growth far and wide. New banks and theatres, cinemas (now showing “talkies”!) and gentlemen clubs grew, majestic and marble-clad, every year. The shipyards and ports, on the contrary, grew quieter and quieter – Britannia no longer ruled the waves – while the discontent grew louder and louder. Jazz music bedazzled socialites and factory girls alike. New celebrities scandalized the withering aristocratic families (and sometimes intermarried with them). Society hostesses held maginificent receptions. The Blackshirts held marches in the East End. London was growing taller, faster and slicker. London was moving towards the unspeakable catastrophe.

Here are the photos of some of the best places in London to see the architecture of the inter-war era.

 

Rudolf Steiner House, 35 Park Road.

Rudolf Steiner House, 35 Park Road.

Rudolf Steiner House, 35 Park Road.

Rudolf Steiner House, 35 Park Road.

Brittanic House.

Brittanic House.

Brittanic House.

Brittanic House.

 

Brittanic House, Moorgate tube.

Brittanic House, Moorgate tube.

Bank of England

Bank of England

Bank of England.

Bank of England.

 

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